Category: EHN Originals

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The dangers of opinion masquerading as fact in science journals: Jerrold J. Heindel

An article written by a group of 19 toxicologists has been published verbatim in eight toxicology journals in the last four months. The article is titled, “Human exposure to synthetic endocrine disrupting chemicals (S-EDCs) is generally negligible as compared to natural compounds with higher or comparable endocrine activity. How to evaluate the risk of the...

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Beyond the “silver lining” of emissions reductions: Clean energy takes a COVID-19 hit

In early March, the Washington state legislature passed a community solar incentives bill meant to help meet renewable energy goals and increase low-income communities’ access to solar technology. The bill, HB 2248, enjoyed widespread stakeholder support; environmental justice groups, renewable energy coalitions, and utility companies were all on board. The day after the bill passed,...

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Join the “Agents of Change” discussion on research and activism

Want to hear more from our “Agents of Change?” Here’s your chance. On July 30, the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE) will host a Q&A discussion featuring four environmental health leaders who participated in Agents of Change, an ongoing series featuring the stories, analyses and perspectives of next generation environmental health leaders who...

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Op-ed: PFAS chemicals—the other immune system threat

“In 2014, my world changed forever when I learned my family was exposed to contaminated drinking water containing high levels of PFAS. Since then, I haven’t stopped worrying about my family’s health,” says Andrea Amico, a New Hampshire resident and PFAS community advocate turned national activist. “Impacted communities didn’t get a choice in their exposure....

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A fracking giant’s fall

Historians generally place the invention of fracking in a gas field in southwestern Kansas in 1947. It remained largely a novelty until the late 1980’s, when a petroleum geologist named George Mitchell found a cost-efficient way to shatter shale rock with a high-pressure mix of water, sand, and chemicals, collecting the oil or gas released...

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The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study. Authored by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, the paper synthesizes scientific literature on the presence and potential health impacts of endocrine...

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Our annual summer reading list, 2020 edition

It’s that time of year again—summer is in full swing as we head into the Fourth of July weekend. Of course, the world looks much different since our last summer reading list—but the power of the book remains. We spend a lot of time writing, reading, and sifting through environmental news, so our book choices...

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Coronavirus is creating a crisis of energy insecurity

As the nation remains in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic, a more insidious crisis is taking root as households are unable to pay their energy bills, risking serious health consequences and increasing debt, while federal and state governments fail to adequately protect vulnerable families. Before COVID-19, one in three American households were struggling to...

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Ode to Jersey

My home state has an epic environmental history. And, believe it or not, it’s not all bad. Let’s start more than a hundred years back. Something happened on the Jersey Shore in 1916 that inspired a movie mega-hit 60 years later. On July 1, Charles Vansant was swimming 50 yards in front of his beachfront...